Modular Shelter

While searching the internet for ‘Origami, modular shelters’ we came across a project called Shelter by Andrew Chadwick – a structure consisting of triangular, cardboard modules adapted from the geometry of Architect Buckminster Fuller’s Geodesic Dome; ‘The work is a retreat from the world in which an individual is able to feel cocooned and protected. ‘Shelter’ is a space which offers a temporary freedom from productive activity, where we are able to expand our imagination. For Chadwick, it should be viewed as a mental laboratory space for an individual to generate ideas. Whilst appearing functionless (in the artist’s words, it is “a sculpture, not a ‘useful’ space”) ‘Shelter’ is a room clearly set aside for contemplation. Chadwick’s central aim is “to build a private thinking space: an empty space in which to focus”. His title directs us towards generic ideas of dwelling: it leaves open the range of associations we are able to bring’ (http://www.ngca.co.uk/docs/Andrew%20Chadwick.pdf).

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(Image – http://www.ngca.co.uk/home/default.asp?id=116)

The simplicity of construction is quite beautiful, and the use of cardboard for the triangular modules echoes parameters set within our own studio brief – that the kitset shelter must incorporate materials sourced from the domestic interior; I’m pretty sure everyone has more than a few cardboard boxes lying around at home!

Thinking that a modular cardboard Geodesic Dome may be an avenue to explore with regards to our own shelter design, we started searching the internet for other examples….

Oscar Tuazon ‘Coming Soon’ 2002

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(Image – http://www.portlandart.net/archives/2008/07/opportunity_is.html)

Steven Morgana’s ‘How Much Does Your Building Weigh?
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It seems that the Geodesic Dome is a very popular design, with people making their own to use, among other things, as cheap playhouses and home-made planetariums. There also seems to be many different ways of putting one together, so the next step in our Geodesic Dome exploration is to brush up on our maths and find a pattern that we understand!
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